Wednesday, 27 June 2018

7 ways to use turmeric easily in your daily life


I use turmeric from fresh grated/ blended root and also turmeric powder.  This super antioxidant, anti-inflammatory herb boasts of an impressive list of health properties from decreasing pain to soothing the gut and supporting the liver.  It enhances dishes, sweet and savoury and is a great way to enjoy food that is healthy and tastes good.

      1.  Make a Sunrise Shape Up Smoothie with it – this super antioxidant smoothie is not just great to help keep your weight in check, it also helps to keep you young. 

      2. Add a crushed thumb piece of turmeric to bone broth to fortify it.  
      
      3.  Stirfry cabbage with 2 pips of chopped garlic, sprinkle of black pepper and ½ tsp of turmeric powder.  
      
      4.  Make a marinate or curry base with fresh turmeric.  I often prepare this in advance and keep single serves frozen in the freezer.
2 stalks lemon grass (just the white part), roughly chopped
1 clove garlic peeled
1 thumb piece ginger
2 thumb pieces turmeric
3-4 kaffir lime leaves
1 handful chillies (optional if you want it hot, and can tolerate the nightshades)
Blend all the ingredients in a strong blender until crushed and well mixed.  This can be frozen and used in curries or marinates for chicken, fish or meat.    

5. Season toasted vegetables with olive oil and ½ teaspoon turmeric powder.  This works well with vegetables that taste quite bland like cauliflower, kumara and potatoes.  

6. Make a golden milk with turmeric.    

7.  Blend some turmeric in your salad dressing to give it some colour and make it more interesting.

Sunrise Shape Up Smoothie


1.      This super antioxidant smoothie is not just great to help keep your weight in check, it also helps to keep you young.  It is packed with beta carotene, Vitamin C and curcuminoids which is anti-inflammatory.

Ingredients:
1 scoop Shape Up
½ orange peeled
½ tsp turmeric powder
½ carrot
1 glass of coconut water

Method:
Blend all ingredients in a strong blender together until smooth.  Enjoy in a tall glass or drink on the go.

Tuesday, 26 June 2018

IBS Symptoms and what you can do to overcome them


How your gut feels can make or break your day.  IBS affects about 15% of the population, more commonly occurring in women than in men.  The symptoms of IBS include bloating, flatulence, excessively frequent bowel movement with soft, watery stools, or absence of bowel movement causing it very hard to defaecate.  IBS is different from IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease the likes of Crohn’s and Ulcerative colitis).  IBS patients do not have increased risk of bowel cancer but IBD patients do.  However, IBS patients can still feel a lot of abdominal discomfort, suffer from fatigue, headaches, nausea and dehydration.  


The triggers for IBS include food, stress and hormones.  Common foods that trigger IBS include dairy, coffee, chocolate, wheat, fried and fatty foods and fibre.  Some forms of IBS do well with more fibre and other form of IBS do better with less fibre!  Stress and nerves can make IBS worse and IBS can make mood worse.  That’s because the gut is the second brain.  Serotonin, the neurotransmitter that makes you feel good, control your appetite and sleep well is made predominantly in the gut.  Patients with IBS often can feel low in the mood due to low serotonin production.  Addressing your IBS will lift your mood and improve your sleep.

Women tend to suffer from IBS more than men as the menstrual cycle changes the hormones at different times of the month.  The days of ovulation or immediately following ovulation and a day or two prior to the period is when IBS symptoms can exacerbate. 

Is it possible to have IBS and be symptom free?  Yes, absolutely.  What needs to happen is to identify your trigger, help your gut heal and you don’t need to suffer from IBS anymore.  Identifying the trigger can be tricky. One man’s meat is another man’s poison. If you have problems, seek the help of a naturopath or naturopathic nutritionist who would address the underlying cause of your symptoms rather than mask the symptoms.  

If your IBS is more constipation than diarrhea, the focus is to help the bowels relax and reduce straining. If you do not empty your bowels adequately daily, you are not helping your body detoxify effectively and this can cause problems in the longer term.  Make sure you are well hydrated, 30mls per kg of body weight of fluid intake per day, and you are consuming adequate fibre from nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables that do not irritate you gut.  If you are constipated, you may get the common symptoms of headaches, nausea, bloating or abdominal pain.  So understanding why you have IBS and what drives your IBS can help you sort out the root cause of your problem!

Monday, 30 April 2018

Do you suffer from premenstrual syndrome and what can do you do about it?


Many women treat premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and other menstrual irregularities as a normal part of their life.  In reality, menstruation should not cause any significant interruption to your everyday life.  If you experienced symptoms of PMS, painful, heavy or irregular periods, it means that your reproductive system is not functioning as well as it should be.



Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is the most common female hormonal imbalance, affecting more than 75% of women at some stage of their lives.  PMS normally occurs in the second half of a woman’s menstrual cycle, between ovulation and the onset of menstruation.  Psychological symptoms of PMS include mood swings, anxiety, irritability, nervous tension, depression, forgetfulness, poor concentration, fatigue or even insomnia.  Physical symptoms can include weight gain from fluid retention, abdominal bloating, headaches, libido issues, constipation and/or diarrhoea.

PMS normally occurs as a result of imbalances in female reproductive hormones, particularly, low levels of progesterone throughout the cycle with elevated oestrogen levels during the second half of the cycle.  It can also be related to “bad” oestrogens and not enough “good” oestrogens.  High levels of another hormone, prolactin may also be involved.

How do you balance your hormones?
You can use a range of herbs and nutrients to correct hormonal imbalances.  Vitex agnus castus has been shown to assist in the management of PMS symptoms by reducing high amounts of prolactin and normalising progesterone levels.  Vitex can also help with irregular periods.  Vitex can work synergistically with other herbs to manage painful, heavy or irregular periods and PMS symptoms such as headaches, sore breasts, fluid retention and abdominal bloating.

If you suffer from mood swings in the second half (luteal phase) of your menstrual cycle, bupleurum and peony can be useful.

Other natural ingredients which may help to maintain a healthy oestrogen balance include:
·                Flaxseed balances good and bad oestrogen;
·                Turmeric which offers potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity;
·                Folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12, which assist the processing of oestrogen in the body.

Apart from herbs, some simple changes to your diet and lifestyle can greatly improve your menstrual cycle:
·                consume a diet rich in fibre which includes fruit and vegetables;
·                increase the intake of good fats such as those from nuts, seeds and fish;
·                drink lots of water (1-2 litres a day);
·                keep yourself active with regular exercise;
·                stop smoking;
·                reduce excess fat;
·                limit salt and saturated fat intake; and
·                reduce caffeine and alcohol consumption.

PMS and other menstrual irregularities are not a normal part of life.  These symptoms are common but common does not equal normal.  You don’t have to put up with the discomfort or pain.  Don’t let your monthly menstrual cycle hinder your ability to do your favourite activities and enjoy life!  Herbs and nutrients, with the appropriate dietary and lifestyle changes can let you take charge of your menstrual cycle again.


Wednesday, 18 April 2018

2018 Environmental Working Group Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen


The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has published the produce with the most pesticides on them (also termed the Dirty Dozen) and the produce with the least pesticide residues on them (also known as the Clean Fifteen).  The lists are as follows:

Dirty Dozen in decreasing order of dirtiness:
1.              Strawberries
2.              Spinach
3.              Nectarines
4.              Apples
5.              Grapes
6.              Peaches
7.              Cherries
8.              Pears
9.              Tomatoes
10.           Celery
11.           Potatoes
12.           Sweet bell peppers

The newcomers are pears and potatoes and cucumbers and cherry tomatoes got dropped off the list!  Spinach is all the way in second place, so beware of those pesticide residues if you use spinach in your smoothies all the time.  Grow your own or buy organic!

Clean Fifteen starting with the cleanest:
1.              Avocado
2.              Corn
3.              Pineapple
4.              Cabbage
5.              Onions
6.              Sweet Peas
7.              Papaya
8.              Asparagus
9.              Mangoes
10.           Eggplant
11.           Honeydew
12.           Kiwifruit
13.           Cantaloupe
14.           Cauliflower
15.           Broccoli
I’m very pleased to see broccoli make it to the Clean 15 list!

Thursday, 15 March 2018

Alkaline diet: why do we need it and how do we have it?


There are many diets out there, and you are probably not alone in trying to work through the minefield and decide which is the best for you.  Should you be keto, paleo, vegan, vegetarian, mediteranean and the list goes on.  There needs an element of individualisation according to your genetic tendency and lifestyle needs.

An alkaline diet is a diet that is high in fresh vegetables, fruits, seeds and nuts.  A review in the Journal of Environmental Health 2012 showed that alkaline diets reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases such as arthritis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes and loss of bone density.

Our blood runs in a tight pH band of about 7.36-7.40.  Our body goes through great lengths to maintain stable blood pH.  A lower pH means our body is acidic, a higher pH means it is basic.  We want to maintain a neutral to slightly alkaline pH.  Alkaline diets have been shown to be beneficial for maintaining good blood pressure, preventing formation of kidney stones, build stronger bones, reduce muscle wasting, lowers chronic pain, boost vitamin absorption and help weight loss.  (NOTE:  do not confuse blood pH with stomach pH.  The stomach is the only part of the body that should maintain an acidic pH to allow digestion to pass through efficiently.)

The total acid load in our diets from our hunter gatherer diets to our current modern diets has increased dramatically.  Our foods have significantly less potassium, magnesium, fibre, essential vitamins and antioxidants and have significantly higher sodium, processed fats and refined carbohydrates.  This causes electrolyte imbalances and acidity.

How to keep an alkaline diet:
  1.  Buy organic foods that have been grown in an alkaline soil.  If you grow you own fruits and vegetables, give the soil enough essential minerals and seaweed.
  2.  Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, they are best bet to increase alkalinity.  Fruits and vegetables like beetroot, cucumber, cabbage, spinach, carrots, beans, alfalfa, barley grass, celery, watermelon, figs, tomatoes, mushrooms, lemons, grapefruit and kale.
  3. Eat plant based protein like almonds, pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, tempeh, tofu, sunflower seeds and hazelnuts.
  4. Reduce intake of acid forming foods, keeping it to no more than 25% of your food intake.  These foods include animal meat, shellfish, dairy, eggs, deli meats, peanuts, walnuts, grains and its derivatives, breads, and baked goods.
  5. Decrease processed and refined foods, sugar, coffee, carbonated drinks, alcohol and cordials.

Precautions and Implementation of Alkaline Diet

It is important to keep a balance of alkaline and acid forming foods.  Some acidic foods like eggs, fish and walnuts have much to offer in terms of nutritional benefits like essential fatty acids and antioxidants.  We are aiming for a healthy balance.  Eat a variety of real, whole, unprocessed foods like fresh fruits and vegetables and limit consumption of packaged and processed foods and beverages.  Should you be drinking alkaline water or bicarbonate of soda to alkalise?  The short answer is No.  Whilst short term studies done on subjects drinking alkaline water and bicarbonate water showed an increase in pH, these studies have not tested the long term effects and addressed the potential of the alkaline fluids in neutralising stomach pH that can cause more problems with pepsin and delayed protein digestion and acid reflux.

Monday, 12 March 2018

Are you at risk of a heart attack or stroke from your painkiller?


The NZ Herald last month published increased risk of a heart attack or stroke from just 4 weeks of use of 5 different painkillers – ibuprofen, celacoxib, mefenamic acid, diclofenac and naproxen.  The trials were done on a large sample size, 56,000 people with hypertension (high blood pressure).

The published study noted that the risk of a cardiovascular event like a heart attack or stroke from 4 weeks of use ranged from 1 in 104 adults to 1 in 394 adults.  There were no significant statistical incidence difference between the 5 drugs.  The events were documented when patients were hospitalised for strokes, heart attacks, TIA and angina.  This has cardiologists calling for tougher control on these Non-Steroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) as some can be purchased from the supermarket from as low as 20 cents per tablet. This puts patients with hypertension at a higher risk if they also suffer from pain and are using NSAIDs to medicate their pain.

In light of this risk, what can you do to deal with pain?  There are many natural options to address the problem.  Natural interventions like acupuncture, massage and frequency specific microcurrent are great methods to reduce and alleviate pain.

If pain is constant and repetitive, address the cause of it - is it from an inflammatory diet that does not agree with you?  Do you have an intolerance that repeatedly trigger the inflammation? Do you have lifestyle habits that are inflammatory?  If you do, change them.

Some of the things you can do include:
  1. Eat a diet high in fresh vegetables and fruits that agree with you.  For some people consuming the vegetables in the nightshade family can increase their pain.  Nightshades include tomatoes, potatoes, capsicum, eggplant and tamarillos.
  2. Reduce intake of processed foods – even if it says high fibre or five star health rating on the packaging.  Most people start of their day with highly processed breakfast cereal that converts to sugar easily and get their inflammatory process brewing. 
  3. Cut out sugar – in all forms.  Sugar is inflammatory.
  4. Breathe and oxygenate – oxygen is crucial to life.  Deep breathing into the abdomen rather than just shallow breathing (like when we are stressed) will help.  If you are shallow breathing because of stress, practice mindfulness, yoga or download some apps to help de-stress. 
  5. Consult your natural health practitioner for herbs and supplements that will tailor towards the type of inflammation and pain you are experiencing- i.e. is it muscular, joint, glandular, headache, abdominal, etc.

Please do not just cover up the symptoms of pain with a band aid like NSAID as it may cause you a major cardiac event!